Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Understanding dementia, Alzheimer's disease and how the Dale can help

Most people with dementia remain undiagnosed by their primary care providers, and families often fail to recognize the significance of early cognitive symptoms. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia is critical. It allows the individual and their family to learn and plan better for the future. There has been a growing interest in screenings for memory problems. A screening can check a person’s memory and other thinking skills. It can indicate if someone might benefit from a more complete medical visit. Early intervention means better quality of life. A person experiencing changes in memory can improve their ability to manage future affairs by seeking help as soon as possible. It is important to identify the disease or problem that is causing memory loss. Some memory problems can be readily treated, such as those caused by vitamin deficiencies or thyroid problems. Other memory problems might result from causes that are not currently reversible, such as Alzheimer’s disease. In general, the earlier the diagnosis, the easiest it is to treat one of these conditions. All individuals should be empowered to make informed decisions to better manage their own health, not discouraged from screening based. Memory screenings are a significant first step toward finding out if a person may have a memory problem. Memory problems could be caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other medical conditions. Who should be screened? Memory screenings make sense for anyone concerned about memory loss or experiencing warning signs of dementia; whose family and friends have noticed changes in them; or who believe they are at risk due to a family history of Alzheimer’s disease or a related illness. Questions to ask: Am I becoming for forgetful? Do I have trouble concentrating? Do I have trouble performing familiar tasks? Do I have trouble recalling words or names in conversation? Do I sometimes forget where I am or where I am going? Am I misplacing things more often? Have family or friends told me that I repeating questions or saying the same thing over and over again? Have I become lost when walking or driving? Have my family or friends noticed changes in my mood, behavior, personality or desire to do things? According to a recent survey by Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, 64% of individuals who responded to the study thought the behavioral symptoms (such as, irritability, anxiety) of the people they were caring for were a normal part of aging prior to their diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. 67% of these caregivers stated that these thoughts delayed the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging, but age is the greatest risk factor. The number of people with the disease doubles for every five-year age interval beyond 65. The memory screening test has 80 – 90% or higher probability of true or accurate screening results - similar to other established screening tests such as a mammography and Pap smear. And, a program for individuals in the early stages of memory impairment is available right here in Niagara County. The dementia-care program emphasizes memory enhancement through cognitive stimulation, education and socialization and is for people in the early stages of memory loss due to Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Parkinson’s disease, or any number of other diseases characterized by memory loss. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. For more information about Memory Minders, The Dale Association, or its programs, please call Angie Blackly at 433-1886 extension 111 or via email at angie.blackley@daleassociation. Or, if you are looking for a fun way to keep the brain stimulated, maybe “Cranium Crunches” is something for you. Stomach crunches are a basic exercise for abdominal strength. Does that mean that cranium crunches will build strength in your cranium? You may have heard that the brain is plastic. As you know, the brain is not made of plastic….neuroplasticity (or brain plasticity) refers to the brain’s ability to change throughout life. The human brain has the amazing ability to reorganize itself by forming new connections between brain cells. For a long time it was believed that as we aged, the connections in the brain became fixed. Research has shown that in fact the brain never stops changing through learning. Plasticity is the capacity of the brain to change with learning. Changes associated with learning occur mostly at the level of the connections between neurons. New connections can form and the internal structure of the existing synapses can change. Cranium Crunches is one way to use brain plasticity to its capacity – to build your brain. Cranium Crunches is a program that uses brain games to stimulate new connections in the brain. It is a monthly program held on the third Tuesday of each month from 10:00 – 11:00am. The public is invited to participate at The Dale Association, 33 Ontario Street, Lockport. Please call 433-1886 to reserve your seat for January 15th and you will see that you want to mark your calendar for the third Tuesday of every month. The Dale Association is a unique non profit organization which has been responding to needs of adults in our Niagara community for 67 years. It has been said many times that our services help make lives better and we are proud to be able to do this for people with so many different needs. The Dale Association’s mission is to provide comprehensive services and coordinate connections for adults in Niagara and neighboring counties which enhance their health and wellness and empower them to build bridges into their communities. This important mission is the focal point of each program – including our Senior Services, Mental Health Services, Enrichment Activities, and Caregiver Support Services. Our Senior Services offer activities that enhance health, encourages community involvement, utilizes years of experience and allows for the development of friendships, as well as a sole local resource for the visually and hearing impaired. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is also among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. Our Mental Health Services have the clearly stated goal of assisting people to remain emotionally stable and living independently in the community. The Enrichment Activities are geared to developing and enhancing skills with the objective of adding to the quality of life. The goal of Caregiver Support Services is to help informal caregivers’ ability to manage and coordinate care. For more information about The Dale Association or its programs, please visit www.daleassociation.com or our blog at http://www.ExceptionalYouAtTheDale.blogspot.

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

How to avoid the winter blues

Ever have the winter blahs? The weather is cold and the days are darker – conditions like this drive us indoors. And, let’s face it, the holiday season can be overwhelming and as we enter January, this can also be a time where people reach an emotional low. Winter causes a mild case of the blues in about 25% of the people in the United States. If you are feeling down in January, you are not alone. Many people feel their mood shrinking this time of year – for lots of different reasons. Some suggestions to avoid the winter blues include: Eating healthy and exercise – make sure you get a variety of fruits and vegetables, eat healthy portions, and exercise. Physical and psychological wellbeing are connected. When your body feels good, so does your mind. Physical exercise releases the “happy hormones”. Sunshine and Vitamin D: new research shows that sufficient amounts of vitamin D reduce the chances of developing depression. Our bodies need sunlight to generate vitamin D. Take a walk and spend some time in the sun – take advantage of every sunny day. Laugh – this sounds simple and it is. Laughter is good for you. Watch a funny movie, be with people who make you laugh, and find the humor in things. Gratitude - Genuinely try to feel grateful – it can bring more meaning and purpose to your life. Looking at the bright side of life and feeling appreciation for the little things in life are great ways to feel better. Remember to say “thank you” for all the little things in your life today. Smile - Research shows that if we force ourselves to smile, after a while we do start feeling better. And, it will work both ways. Smiling at somebody may just brighten their day – and receiving a smile may brighten your day. So – smile today! Wear bright colors – you’ll be surprised how it can lift your mood. Music – listening to upbeat music can be uplifting as well. Socialization –The benefits of being with other people are well documented and I often write about why socialization is so important. Those that interact with others tend to be healthier, both physically and mentally, than those who become socially isolated. Happiness is getting out and being with people, and that's why I recommend it. The Dale Association is a great place to start; if you are reading this, please make The Dale a part of your 2019. We understand the importance of overall health and well being to the strength of our community. Activity is beneficial for health of people of all ages, including the older population. It can increase longevity, lower the risk of developing chronic diseases, helps to maintain individual living and enhances the overall quality of life. The Dale Association is a unique non profit organization which has been responding to needs of adults in our Niagara community for 67 years. It has been said many times that our services help make lives better and we are proud to be able to do this for people with so many different needs. The Dale Association’s mission is to provide comprehensive services and coordinate connections for adults in Niagara and neighboring counties which enhance their health and wellness and empower them to build bridges into their communities. This important mission is the focal point of each program – including our Senior Services, Mental Health Services, Enrichment Activities, and Caregiver Support Services. Our Senior Services offer activities that enhance health, encourages community involvement, utilizes years of experience and allows for the development of friendships, as well as a sole local resource for the visually and hearing impaired. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is also among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. Our Mental Health Services have the clearly stated goal of assisting people to remain emotionally stable and living independently in the community. The Enrichment Activities are geared to developing and enhancing skills with the objective of adding to the quality of life. The goal of Caregiver Support Services is to help informal caregivers’ ability to manage and coordinate care. For more information about The Dale Association or its programs, please visit www.daleassociation.com or our blog at http://www.ExceptionalYouAtTheDale.blogspot.

Friday, December 21, 2018

Holiday Eating

The holiday season is upon us. For many, the holidays are a time of travel, parties, big meals, snack foods and drinking - all can create a challenging environment for eating healthy. Also, during the holiday season, so many people fail to prepare for the onslaught of junk food, chocolates, candy, and other snacks and unhealthy meals that will assault them while they are gift shopping. Because you’re going to run into massive temptation during the holiday season, here are some tips: If you’re starving while shopping and you have to get something to eat, choose one of the healthier restaurants instead of the fast food options inside the food court. Believe it or not, loud and chaotic environments actually cause people to eat more. So, choose a low-key, healthy restaurant instead, and you can order a sensible meal instead of indulging in the high-calorie, high-fat, high sugar meals that you’d typically get in a fast food setting. It’s really tough avoiding junk food and other unhealthy snacks during the holiday season no matter where you are, but surprisingly enough, this is especially true at the office. People are always bringing in holiday cakes, cookies, cupcakes, candy, chocolates, and all kinds of other delicious yet calorie laden snacks. The attraction is incredibly difficult for many people, but mostly because they haven’t prepared for the inevitable onslaught of holiday temptations. To combat these temptations, we highly recommend leaving healthy snacks on hand at the office. If you have something else to munch on while everyone else is stuffing their face with holiday treats, you’ll be able to stick to your healthy eating plan and not feel deprived or left out. Don’t deprive yourself completely. You’ll get frustrated, feel unhappy, and ultimately give up and go overboard if you completely deprive yourself of amazing holiday treats. So, indulge a little during the holidays and then immediately go back to your healthy meal plan when you’re through. While attending holiday parties, you should avoid eating high-calorie foods by not putting too many of them on your plate when you do decide to eat. When we have a variety of different foods on our plates, we tend to eat more no matter how hungry we are, so put less food on your plate and you’ll find it easier to avoid. Eat a small, balanced meal or snack before you leave home. If you arrive to the party hungry, you’ll be more likely to overindulge (another great reason to NOT skip breakfast and lunch). Study ALL of the food options, and think about what you are going to have before you put anything on your plate. Decide which foods are worth eating and which can be ignored, and then stick to that decision. Hosting? Make sure the menu includes healthy food choices such as fruits, vegetables and lean meats. Baking, broiling and barbecuing are good methods for cooking meats such as turkey. Avoid frying or adding extra fat during cooking. When you’re cooking, avoid sampling the foods more than necessary. If you’re the host of the dinner, clear the table and put unused food away to help guests avoid grazing. Are you a guest at a family member’s or friends home? Offer to bring along a healthy dish that you know you will enjoy and can substitute for a not so healthy options. After your meal, take a walk with family and friends. Exercise will also get you moving, keep you focused on your goals, and give you a welcome break from being surrounded by treats. If you plan to travel to enjoy the holidays with loved ones, you will likely be spending time away from home in cars or on airplanes. The eating on-the-go that comes along with travel makes it hard to maintain control of food choices. Plus, exhausting travel days pose other challenges to healthy eating by throwing off meal times and limiting good food options. Bring along snacks that are both satisfying and convenient like protein-packed beef jerky, single pouches of tuna and string cheese and high-fiber plant-based foods like fresh fruit, banana chips, nuts, seeds, and roasted chickpea snacks. There are always endless reasons to not make changes. Whether it’s the difficulty of limiting holiday indulgences or not wanting to disappoint your host by saying no to second portions, excuses abound. It might seem like there couldn’t be a worse time than the start of the holiday season to commit to a healthy lifestyle, but in fact there’s no better time than now. Considering that holiday eating often results in excess weight gain that only leads to New Year’s resolutions and dieting, starting now can help reframe old thinking patterns and stop procrastination. During this holiday season make a promise to put yourself at the top of your list. The Dale Association is a unique non profit organization which has been responding to needs of adults in our Niagara community for 67 years. It has been said many times that our services help make lives better and we are proud to be able to do this for people with so many different needs. The Dale Association’s mission is to provide comprehensive services and coordinate connections for adults in Niagara and neighboring counties which enhance their health and wellness and empower them to build bridges into their communities. This important mission is the focal point of each program – including our Senior Services, Mental Health Services, Enrichment Activities, and Caregiver Support Services. Our Senior Services offer activities that enhance health, encourages community involvement, utilizes years of experience and allows for the development of friendships, as well as a sole local resource for the visually and hearing impaired. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is also among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. Our Mental Health Services have the clearly stated goal of assisting people to remain emotionally stable and living independently in the community. The Enrichment Activities are geared to developing and enhancing skills with the objective of adding to the quality of life. The goal of Caregiver Support Services is to help informal caregivers’ ability to manage and coordinate care. For more information about The Dale Association or its programs, please visit www.daleassociation.com or our blog at http://www.ExceptionalYouAtTheDale.blogspot.

Smell and Taste Sensory Changes

This week, my column discusses sensory changes that accompany aging – specifically the changes to taste and smell that come with aging. In a recent study, the foods most often identified by taste and smell were: salt 89%, coffee 71%, tomato 69%, fish 59% and sugar 57%. There is an indication that the senses of taste and smell decline significantly with age. If an individual is also having difficulty with their vision, they may be quite limited in their ability to identify foods, causing foods to have little appeal. Distinctive textures and temperatures, such as in ice cream or popcorn, can be important for the enjoyment of foods. Poor nutrition can have serious consequences for elderly people, so it is important that they eat properly. Tasteless foods make eating less enjoyable and bland, low salt or other diet restrictions can contribute to the undesirability of food. A pleasant mealtime atmosphere and foods that are enjoyed in a social setting can make people feel more like eating. Talking about food, the good taste and smell can make the food appear to taste better. Condiments and foods with strong flavors may also help to maintain interest in eating. Poor sense of smell and taste may make it difficult to recognize spoiled foods or the smell of danger such as gas. This is a potential hazard for the person who lives alone. Older people with diminished smell and taste are encouraged to keep track of the age of foods in their refrigerators and check the pilot lights of gas stoves regularly. Also, family members and friends can also check these things whenever they visit. I hope this bit of information has been helpful. If you are looking after a parent, grandparent, friend, or elderly family member, please remember these tips that can help you compensate for the effects of diminished taste and smell on your loved one. The Dale Association is a unique non profit organization which has been responding to needs of adults in our Niagara community for 67 years. It has been said many times that our services help make lives better and we are proud to be able to do this for people with so many different needs. The Dale Association’s mission is to provide comprehensive services and coordinate connections for adults in Niagara and neighboring counties which enhance their health and wellness and empower them to build bridges into their communities. This important mission is the focal point of each program – including our Senior Services, Mental Health Services, Enrichment Activities, and Caregiver Support Services. Our Senior Services offer activities that enhance health, encourages community involvement, utilizes years of experience and allows for the development of friendships, as well as a sole local resource for the visually and hearing impaired. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is also among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. Our Mental Health Services have the clearly stated goal of assisting people to remain emotionally stable and living independently in the community. The Enrichment Activities are geared to developing and enhancing skills with the objective of adding to the quality of life. The goal of Caregiver Support Services is to help informal caregivers’ ability to manage and coordinate care. For more information about The Dale Association or its programs, please visit www.daleassociation.com or our blog at http://www.ExceptionalYouAtTheDale.blogspot.

Senior Citizens Exemption for STAR program

This week, my column is about the Senior Citizens Exemption for the STAR program. A special thank you to Jill Lederhouse from the Town of Lockport for asking me to help spread the word about some of the changes for 2019. She wants residents to know that to renew your 2019 exemption will require a few extra steps – but don’t worry, your Assessor’s office is there to help you. First, a few of the basics. Local governments and school districts in New York State can opt to grant a reduction on the amount of property taxes paid by qualifying senior citizens. This is accomplished by reducing the taxable assessment of the senior's home. To qualify, seniors generally must be 65 years of age or older and meet certain income limitations and other requirements. You must own the property for at least 12 consecutive months prior to the date of filing for the senior citizens exemption, unless you received the exemption for your previous residence. Please check with your local assessor or city/town clerk to determine what is in effect for your municipality. To apply or reapply for the senior citizens exemption, you will need to file the applicable form with your assessor. There are three simple forms that will need to be signed and returned: Step 1: You will sign for RP-425 Rnw to apply for the Enhanced STAR portion of your exemption. Step 2: You will have to sign RP-425-IVP, providing your Social Security. Step 3: Renew your Senior Citizens Exemption. Providing current (2018) income or a filed 2017 Tax Return. Steps 1 & 2 should not have to be repeated in the future. If the State has any issues in determining your eligibility for the Enhanced STAR portion of your exemption, they will contact you, either by mail or phone. What is considered income for the Senior Citizens Exemption? The exemption requires the Assessors follow Real Property Tax Law, and not the IRS Tax Law. Therefore, the Assessors will be looking for items such as: - Annual Earnings Statement on IRA accounts, non-taxable, however invested (Interest, Dividends or Capital Gains) - Annuity Payments, including IRAs (Form 1099) - Income from Estates or Trusts - Interest or Dividends bearing Savings and/or Checking Accounts - Investment Interest or Dividends, including non-taxable bonds and IRAs - Capital Gains from sale or exchange of investments - Self-Employment NET income (must show both income and expenses) - Rental Income and Expenses (including room & board or other funds from other residents or family members sharing expenses of the dwelling) - Alimony or Support Payments - Unemployment Insurance Payments - Disability Payments (including VA Benefits and/or Railroad Benefits) - Worker’s Compensation - Lottery / Gambling winnings - Pensions (including VA or NYS Pension (ex: teacher or state employee) - December’s month-end statements may be required to show interest Lederhouse says, “I want to help get the word out that coming into 2019, renewing your exemptions requires a few extra steps. But, please don’t let this concern you, we are here to help you. Please contact your assessor’s office if you have questions.” The Dale Association is a unique non profit organization which has been responding to needs of adults in our Niagara community for 67 years. It has been said many times that our services help make lives better and we are proud to be able to do this for people with so many different needs. The Dale Association’s mission is to provide comprehensive services and coordinate connections for adults in Niagara and neighboring counties which enhance their health and wellness and empower them to build bridges into their communities. This important mission is the focal point of each program – including our Senior Services, Mental Health Services, Enrichment Activities, and Caregiver Support Services. Our Senior Services offer activities that enhance health, encourages community involvement, utilizes years of experience and allows for the development of friendships, as well as a sole local resource for the visually and hearing impaired. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is also among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. Our Mental Health Services have the clearly stated goal of assisting people to remain emotionally stable and living independently in the community. The Enrichment Activities are geared to developing and enhancing skills with the objective of adding to the quality of life. The goal of Caregiver Support Services is to help informal caregivers’ ability to manage and coordinate care. For more information about The Dale Association or its programs, please visit www.daleassociation.com or our blog at http://www.ExceptionalYouAtTheDale.blogspot.

Join us for SMILE

When somebody smiles at you, it feels good and we want to smile back. When you think about “smile”, it denotes positivity, joy, happiness and sociability. At The Dale, SMILE also means a program that offers: Socialization Meaningful Stimulation Inspiring Lunch Exercise SMILE is a new program and will be offered on Wednesdays beginning January 9, 2019 and run from 9:00am – 12:00pm at The Dale Association, 33 Ontario Street, Lockport. Each session will include: games and interactive media, cooking and/or crafts, fellowship, chair exercise, lunch, and of course laughter and so much more. Please call 433-1886 for member/non-member cost and to sign up. I often write about the benefits of socialization and keeping active. Research continues to show that social activity has a positive benefit on health and well-being, and studies show that more socially active older adults have better cognitive outcomes and are less vulnerable to progressive decline. For example, a study shows that over a five-year period, individuals with the largest social networks had 39% less cognitive decline and half the memory decline compared to people with the lowest social interaction. Social activity can take many forms, from one-on-one conversations to group activities. The recent study explored which types of social activity might have the greatest cognitive benefit for older adults. Research suggests that, although individual engagement does provide benefits as well, group engagement may offer unique cognitive benefits to older adults, and that this impact increases as people grow older. Beyond cognitive performance, studies have also suggested that quality of life has additional pay-offs in terms of well-being, and mental and physical health. That’s what The Dale Association is all about and what a great opportunity for you or somebody you know to participate in SMILE. The Dale Association is a unique non profit organization which has been responding to needs of adults in our Niagara community for 67 years. It has been said many times that our services help make lives better and we are proud to be able to do this for people with so many different needs. The Dale Association’s mission is to provide comprehensive services and coordinate connections for adults in Niagara and neighboring counties which enhance their health and wellness and empower them to build bridges into their communities. This important mission is the focal point of each program – including our Senior Services, Mental Health Services, Enrichment Activities, and Caregiver Support Services. Our Senior Services offer activities that enhance health, encourages community involvement, utilizes years of experience and allows for the development of friendships, as well as a sole local resource for the visually and hearing impaired. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is also among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. Our Mental Health Services have the clearly stated goal of assisting people to remain emotionally stable and living independently in the community. The Enrichment Activities are geared to developing and enhancing skills with the objective of adding to the quality of life. The goal of Caregiver Support Services is to help informal caregivers’ ability to manage and coordinate care. For more information about The Dale Association or its programs, please visit www.daleassociation.com or our blog at http://www.ExceptionalYouAtTheDale.blogspot.

Monday, November 19, 2018

Winter Safety

As I am writing this, it is snowing and sleeting and we are to expect the first winter like weather of the season locally and much of the nation is under weather warnings or advisories. So, I offer some winter safety tips for people of all ages. Avoid Slipping on Ice: Make sure to wear shoes with good traction and non-skid soles, and stay inside until the roads are clear. Replace a worn cane tip to make walking easier. Take off shoes as soon as you return indoors because often snow and ice attach to the soles and, once melted, can lead to slippery conditions inside. Dress for Warmth: Cold temperatures can lead to frostbite and hypothermia. Don’t let indoor temperatures go too low and dress in layers. Going outside? Wear warm socks, a heavy coat, a warm hat, gloves and a scarf. Cover all exposed skill in very cold temperatures. Use a scarf to cover your mouth and protect your lungs. Check the Car: Get your car serviced before wintertime hits, or ask a family member to bring it to the garage for you. Checking oil, tires, brakes, battery and wipers can make a big difference on winter roads. Make sure wiper fluid is filled and there is a proper mixture of antifreeze in the cooling system. Also, make sure your road emergency membership is up to date. Parking Lot Safety: When walking in a parking lot, stay to the sides of the aisle and watch for cars. Make eye contact with an approaching driver; stop walking if you don’t think the driver has seen you. Use all your senses and do not talk on the phone or use headphones while walking in a parking lot. Snow can muffle sound of an approaching vehicle. Before you exit a parking space, adjust seat, mirrors, etc. and do not cut across parking space lines or park near drifts. Prepare for Power Outages: Winter storms can lead to power outages. Make sure you have easy access to flashlights and battery powered radio in case the power goes out. Stockpile warm blankets. Keep a supply of non-perishable foods that can be eaten cold on hand. If the power goes out, wear several layers of clothing, including a hat. Keep moving to raise your body temperature. Fight Wintertime Depression: To help avoid depression having less contact with others during cold months, arrange a check-in system with family members or neighbors and friends (or The Dale Association’s Telephone Reassurance Program). Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Using a fireplace, gas heater or lanterns can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning. Ensure your safety by checking the batteries on your carbon monoxide detector and buying an updated one if you need to. Walk like a penguin on slippery surfaces: Here is a fun little poem to help you be safe and remember to walk like a penguin when walking on slippery surfaces. When things get cold and icy, and your path looks kind of dicey – waddle On. Keep your toes all pointed out-y, keep your knees all loosey-goosey – waddle on. Keep your hands outside your pockets, take short steps so you won’t rocket – waddle on. Take it slowly, holy-moly, so you don’t fall down and roll-y – waddle on. Walking like a penguin with short steps is the way to walk safely on slippery surfaces. I hope you find these winter safety tips helpful. The Dale Association is a unique non profit organization which has been responding to needs of adults in our Niagara community for 67 years. It has been said many times that our services help make lives better and we are proud to be able to do this for people with so many different needs. The Dale Association’s mission is to provide comprehensive services and coordinate connections for adults in Niagara and neighboring counties which enhance their health and wellness and empower them to build bridges into their communities. This important mission is the focal point of each program – including our Senior Services, Mental Health Services, Enrichment Activities, and Caregiver Support Services. Our Senior Services offer activities that enhance health, encourages community involvement, utilizes years of experience and allows for the development of friendships, as well as a sole local resource for the visually and hearing impaired. Memory Minders a social program for individuals with mild memory loss is also among The Dale Association’s community support services helping to improve the quality of life for adults. Our Mental Health Services have the clearly stated goal of assisting people to remain emotionally stable and living independently in the community. The Enrichment Activities are geared to developing and enhancing skills with the objective of adding to the quality of life. The goal of Caregiver Support Services is to help informal caregivers’ ability to manage and coordinate care. For more information about The Dale Association or its programs, please visit www.daleassociation.com or our blog at http://www.ExceptionalYouAtTheDale.blogspot.